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Search Results for: "Fishing"



"If you take a woman fishing, it has to be a dull one. Anybody lively scares away the fish. There’s a special type of woman, in fact, who is chosen for fishing holidays."

Elizabeth Jenkins

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"There’s nothing like fishing to pass the time and to incline toward a sort of magnificent stupidity in which nothing matters but tackle, bait, sunlight and the strike."

Faith Baldwin, Honor Bound (1934)

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"I lived to fish, becoming, in my own mind, a fishing czarina, my luck with rod, reel and bait phenomenal."

Lorian Hemingway, "Walk on Water for Me," in Holly Morris, ed., A Different Angle: Fly Fishing Stories by Women (1995)

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"Trout fishing is like any other sport. It is waste of words to try to give anyone who has never tried it any idea of what it means to land a five-pound trout on a gossamer leader."

Cornelia Stratton Parker, Wanderer's Circle (1934)

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"There is one distinctive charm about fishing — its fascinations will stand any climate. You may sit crouching on ice over a hole inside the arctic circle, or on a Windsor chair by the side of the River Lea in the so-called temperate zone, or you may squat in a canoe on an equatorial river, with the surrounding atmosphere forty-five percent mosquito, and if you are fishing you will enjoy yourself …"

Mary Kingsley, West African Studies (1899)

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"… the fishermen of Port Sonas care only for the two things, fishing and women. And there’s some that are no’ that keen on the fishing."

Naomi Mitchison, Lobsters on the Agenda (1952)

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"…Grandpa’s mind had left us, gone wild and wary. When I walked with him I could feel how strange it was. His thoughts swam between us, hidden under rocks, disappearing in weeds, and I was fishing for them, dangling my own words like baits and lures."

Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine (1984)

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"… there is nothing more irritating to a feminist than the average ‘Woman’s Page’ of a newspaper, with its out-dated assumption that all women have a common trade interest in the household arts, and a common leisure interest in clothes and the doings of ‘high society.’ Women’s interests to-day are as wide as the world. I doubt if there is anything from deep-sea fishing to high-altitude flying that is not of absorbing interest to some woman somewhere."

Cyrstal Eastman, "What Shall We Do With the Woman's Page?" in Time and Tide (1927)

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"The first fishing trip of the year is always like this, for me; I spend the first hour or two trying to remember the little I know about fishing, including why I thought it was fun. Then I settle into it and never want to go home."

Elizabeth Gunn, Triple Play (1997)

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"Fishing, one can think of many things at once. Thoughts dart through the mind, different topics, as fish through the water."

Mary O'Hara, Green Grass of Wyoming (1946)

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"… when one went fishing in information networks, one also became fish food."

Carol O'Connell, Mallory's Oracle (1994)

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"Mama went fishing every time the spirit moved her to go, and the spirit moved her every time Brother Tiffin offered to take her."

Evelyn Fairbanks, The Days of Rondo (1990)

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"What I do is called ‘fishing.’ If it was easy, we would refer to it as ‘catching,’ and there would be a lot more people doing it."

Linda Greenlaw, The Hungry Ocean: A Swordboat Captain's Journey (1999)

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"Fishermen say things like dip our lines. They say they are going out to teach the worm how to swim. Or that they are taking a minnow for a ride. They never simply say they are going fishing. Maybe they don’t want anyone to know what they are trying to do."

Helen Foster, It's Hard to Look Graceful When You're Dragging Your Feet (1983)

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"The truth is, fly fishing is folly: useless, unreasonable, irrational, and without purpose. Fly fishing is folly precisely because it makes survival harder than it already is, and by doing so, turns survival into art."

Ailm Travler, "Fly Fishing Folly," in Holly Morris, ed., Uncommon Waters: Women Write About Fishing (1991)

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"Such a nice day — out all day up in the Carter Notch direction, trout-fishing, with the long drive there and the long drive home again in time for supper. It was a lovely brook and I caught seven good trout and one small one — which eight trout-persons you should have for your breakfast if only you were near enough. It was not alone the fishing, but the delightful loneliness and being out of doors."

Sarah Orne Jewett, letter to Annie Fields (1896), in Annie Fields, ed., Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911)

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"A query letter is like a fishing expedition; don’t put too much bait on your hook or you’ll lose your quarry. Be brief and be tantalizing!"

Jane von Mehren, in Deborah Brodie, ed., Writing Changes Everything (1997)

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"The compulsion to rescue willy-nilly those who are drowning strikes to the heart of our freedoms. I am all for fishing out of the water those who fall in, but let us respect those who have thrown themselves in."

Comtesse Diane, Les Glanes de la Vie (1898)

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"Every time I caught a fish, I wondered how something so small could have such clear, pure strength. It kept reminding me of another sensation, from another realm. The fish on the line, I eventually realized, felt like the baby, kicking inside you. Or the shocking, life-hungry pull of the baby on the breast. Perhaps fishing is like quickening for men, a long and patient wait for a few electric moments when they feel connected to another life."

Marni Jackson, The Mother Zone (1992)

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"According to Nan, dating is a whole lot like fishing. Once the catch is in the boat, Nan says, pretty soon it starts to smell."

Barbara Taylor McCafferty, in Barbara Taylor McCafferty and Beverly Taylor Herald, Double Murder (1996)

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"Fly fishing is beyond sport, skill, and even obsession. It’s a religion …"

Lin Sutherland, "A River Ran Over Me," in Holly Morris, A Different Angle: Fly Fishing Stories by Women (1995)

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"Lucy remembered then what the river had taught her, that sometimes fishing was not about fishing at all and that the most memorable trout were never hooked but only imagined in the stillness of a moment sitting patiently on a bank and silently observing her own breath."

Elizabeth Storer, "Fishing Lessons," in Holly Morris, ed., A Different Angle: Fly Fishing Stories by Women (1995)

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"He understood that, like a good marriage, fly fishing looked easy from the outside."

Elizabeth Storer, "Fishing Lessons," in Holly Morris, ed., A Different Angle: Fly Fishing Stories by Women (1995)

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"The man who goes fishing gets something more than the fish he catches."

Mary Astor, A Life on Film (1967)

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"Fly fishing moments are often solitary and fleeting, but they are deeply and sometimes inexplicably compelling. Those who survive the trials of the neophyte — fatal casts, sodden waders and fishless days — to become fluent in the muted colors and dignified prose of fly fishing, know the magic it can work: a soul scrubbed clean of life’s trivia, the experience of witnessing nature’s subtle rhythms, the possibility of a perfect day."

Holly Morris, A Different Angle: Fly Fishing Stories by Women (1995)

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"Fishing seems to be the most evocative of sports, which perhaps explains why throughout literature it has become a powerful and often used metaphor for life."

Holly Morris, Uncommon Waters: Women Write about Fishing (1991)

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"When God forgives He forgets. He buries our sins in the sea and puts a sign on the bank saying, ‘No Fishing Allowed.’"

Corrie ten Boom, Tramp for the Lord (1974)

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"It’s nice, when fishing, to catch a fish. But it doesn’t really matter if you don’t. What you always catch is a quiet time sitting at the water’s edge, or in a gently rocking boat, a silent time of water and sky and the movement of natural things."

Ruth Rudner, Forgotten Pleasures (1978)

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"Fishing can come as close to doing nothing as anything I can think of."

Ruth Rudner, Forgotten Pleasures (1978)

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"The capacity to sacrifice, like any skill, always needs some fine tuning. It is one thing to sacrifice briefly one’s sleep to comfort a child with a bad dream; it is quite another for a mother to sacrifice her whole career for a child. It is one thing for a father to sacrifice his desire to go fishing today because he needs to go to work to feed the family; it is quite another to work for forty years at a job he hates. … often such massive sacrifice, if not a result of cowardice, comes from an inability to discriminate beween giving that is necessary and life-giving and giving that brings death to the Martyr and hence to those around him or her."

Carol S. Pearson, The Hero Within: Six Archetypes We Live By (1986)

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"… some veil between childhood and the present is necessary. If the veil is withdrawn, the artistic imagination sickens and dies, the prophet looks in the mirror with a disillusioned and cynical sneer, the scientist goes fishing."

Margaret Mead, Male and Female (1949)

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"I will now choose among four good sports and honorable pastimes — to wit, among hunting, hawking, fishing and fowling. The best, in my simple judgment, is fishing, called angling, with a rod and a line and a hook."

Juliana Berners, The Treatyse of Fysshynge Wyth an Angle (1496)

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"Broadly speaking, it would appear that the American woman, like her British kin beyond the sea, has taken a dip into every occupation. The advance of woman has been complete, and, with the exception of the United States army and navy, there are no blanks. She labors in the field and dairy, and thrives as a farmer, planter and overseer. She goes forth in a boat and braves the wind and sea in fishing, and drags the bed of the ocean for oysters. She may be found in lumber camps, doing duty as wood-chopper and lumberman, and even as a raftsman woman has tried her hand, and is not afraid to own up to the census man. With pick and dynamite she quarries stone and delves into the earth in search of the common minerals and the precious metals. In the professional world woman has made her appearance in every occupation save that of marshaling armies and conducting war. Her progress in professional life has been as marked as in trade and industry."

Frances E. Willard, Occupations for Women (1897)

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"With the pollution of our rivers today they are changing the signs from ‘No Fishing’ to ‘No Fish.’"

Joan Rivers, in Joey Adams, Speaker's Bible of Humor (1972)

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"[On fishing:] Greatest rest in the world for the brain."

Mary Roberts Rinehart, The Red Lamp (1925)

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"It’s all very well to run around saying regulation is bad, get the government off our backs, etc. Of course our lives are regulated. When you come to a stop sign, you stop; if you want to go fishing, you get a license; if you want to shoot ducks, you can shoot only three ducks. The alternative is dead bodies at the intersections, no fish and no ducks. OK?"

Molly Ivins, in Fort Worth Star-Telegram (1995)

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"… everyone’s free to embark on either a great clipper or a little fishing boat. An artist is an explorer who oughtn’t to shrink from anything: it doesn’t matter whether he goes to the left or the right — his goal sanctifies all."

George Sand, 1866, in Francis Steegmuller and Barbara Bray, eds., Flaubert-Sand: The Correspondence (1993)

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"… fishing teaches a stern morality; inculcates a remorseless honesty."

Virginia Woolf, "Fishing," The Moment (1947)

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"It is remarkable how generous fishermen are. When you meet a man who has returned from a fishing trip he always tells you that he gave his share to the other fellow."

Mary Wilson Little, A Paragrapher's Reveries (1904)

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"The curious thing about fishing is that you never want to go home. If you catch something, you can’t stop. If you don’t catch anything, you hate to leave in case something might bite."

Gladys Taber, The Book of Stillmeadow (1948)

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"… catching something is purely a by-product of our fishing. It is the act of fishing that wipes way all grief, lightens all worry, dissolves fear and anxiety."

Gladys Taber, The Book of Stillmeadow (1948)

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